Children: How do you enforce a Contact/Access Order?

 How do you enforce a Contact/Access Order?

The Children and Adoption Act 2006

In brief

It has always been difficult to enforce contact orders, as judges have been reluctant to do so for fear of worsening the conflict between the child’s parents. Although powers exist to imprison parents who breach contact orders, and to transfer residence/custody to the other parent, the courts feel that to do so conflicts with their duty to make orders which are in the child’s best interests.

A few years ago, a very wide government consultation took place, to find out how contact could be ‘made’ to work. A new approach was taken, which aimed to deal more effectively with problem parents, by giving the courts novel and various new powers. The result was the Children and Adoption Act 2006 (CAA) which came into force on 8th December 2008. The aim of the CAA 2006 is to be tougher on parties who breach contact orders and to introduce new remedies to run parallel to the old ones.

Blanchards Law in Mail on Sunday

http://www.absolutepublishing.com/Portals/0/Uploads/RateCards/MOS_Weddings_MediaPack_020212.pdfBlanchards Law features in Wedding Essentials Supplement in Mail on Sunday on 11 March 2012

How & When to obtain a Financial Settlement in England after a Foreign Divorce

How & When to obtain a Financial Settlement in England after a Foreign Divorce

There are many reasons as to why I receive enquiries from clients as to the ability of the English Court to make financial orders over assets, money or property in England or elsewhere. The English courts are, in the main, helpful, structured and principled, and also have the advantage of worldwide jurisdiction over property and assets wherever they are situate. This means that judges in this country will have no qualms about ordering the sale of a house, for example, in Bahrain. The enforcement of that order in Bahrain later on is of course an entirely separate matter.